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The Chart-Busters

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The Chart-Busters

 Based on the tales of Shiva, Amish Tripathi’s  ‘Shiva Trilogy’, which is a series of three books on the deity, traces the journey of Shiva from the magical land Meluha to Panchavati. The first book, The Immortals of Meluha, discovers Shiva’s journey in the land of Meluha where he fights for the cause of protecting the land of the Suryavanshis from the atrocities of the Chandarvanshis. It is during this course of time that he meets his love  of his life Princess Sati and later fights a battle to prove that he is a true Neelkantha and saves Sati from evil. The second book, The Secret Of the Nagas, unearths Shiva’s battle with the Nagas, who disguised as snakes, have an exceptional skill to fight against the Suryavanshis. Travelling deep into the territory under the guidance of Kali, he reaches Panchavati where he is attacked by the Daiva Astra. It is here that he learns about the truth about the Nagas and the strategies to wage a battle against them. In the third book, The Oath of the Vayuputras, Tripathi talks about the end of Shiva’s journey where he fights a battle with the Vayuputras. And it is here that his transformation into a deity happens.

 

Anand Neelakantan’s book, Asura — Tales of The Vanquished: The Story of Ravana and His People, as the name suggests is a book about the Ramayana, but from the point of view of Ravana himself. Contrary to his image as that of a demon, having black magical powers, he has been projected as a man of principle with elements of being daring and brave. The book talks about the Asuras, their life pattern, their strengths and weaknesses. The narrative in fact runs parallel, from the point of view of two people. So, we have two versions of a similar story: One from Ravana’s perspective of that of a king, and the second from Bhadra, a commoner who is loyal to Ravana. Bhadra narrates the story from a poor man’s point of view. However, in both the stories, Ravana has been shown in a positive light. This is not to say that Neelakantan attempts to defame the Devas. But he simply attempts to put things in perspective from the loser point of view.

 

Ashwin Sanghi’s book, The Krishna Key, is a historical as well as mythological feat that aims to examine Krishna’s existence. Importantly, the book is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the life and history of Lord Krishna and also the Mahabharata. The second part narrates a fictional story of Ravi Mohan Saini. The novel starts with krishna’s history some 5,000 years ago and then merges with the story of Saini who has been accused of murder of his childhood friend Anil Varshney. In an attempt to clear his name, Saini looks into the past of Indian mythology’s grey areas and uncovers the truth about a serial killer who believes himself to be Kalki, the final avatar of Lord Vishnu. Saini travels from the ancient ruins of the lost city of Dvaraka to Vrindavan temples in an attempt to discover one of Krishna’s treasures and stop the killer from murdering his friends who are also under the threat. The biography of Krishna runs in parallel to the main story line. 

 

Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata (The Great Indian Epics Retold), a book by Devdutt Pattanaik, though does not have a new story, plot or characters, but the candid way in which the author retells the story of the Mahabharata is astounding. There is so much clarity and simplicity. The tales, though known, reveal the eternal relevance of the Mahabharata, the complex and disturbing meditation on the human condition that has shaped Indian thought for over 3,000 years. Pattanaik seamlessly weaves into a single narrative plots from the Sanskrit classic as well as its many folk and regional variants, including the Pandavani of Chhattisgarh, Gondhal of Maharashtra, Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu, and Yakshagana of Kamataka.The Chart-Busters

 Based on the tales of Shiva, Amish Tripathi’s  ‘Shiva Trilogy’, which is a series of three books on the deity, traces the journey of Shiva from the magical land Meluha to Panchavati. The first book, The Immortals of Meluha, discovers Shiva’s journey in the land of Meluha where he fights for the cause of protecting the land of the Suryavanshis from the atrocities of the Chandarvanshis. It is during this course of time that he meets his love  of his life Princess Sati and later fights a battle to prove that he is a true Neelkantha and saves Sati from evil. The second book, The Secret Of the Nagas, unearths Shiva’s battle with the Nagas, who disguised as snakes, have an exceptional skill to fight against the Suryavanshis. Travelling deep into the territory under the guidance of Kali, he reaches Panchavati where he is attacked by the Daiva Astra. It is here that he learns about the truth about the Nagas and the strategies to wage a battle against them. In the third book, The Oath of the Vayuputras, Tripathi talks about the end of Shiva’s journey where he fights a battle with the Vayuputras. And it is here that his transformation into a deity happens.

 

Anand Neelakantan’s book, Asura — Tales of The Vanquished: The Story of Ravana and His People, as the name suggests is a book about the Ramayana, but from the point of view of Ravana himself. Contrary to his image as that of a demon, having black magical powers, he has been projected as a man of principle with elements of being daring and brave. The book talks about the Asuras, their life pattern, their strengths and weaknesses. The narrative in fact runs parallel, from the point of view of two people. So, we have two versions of a similar story: One from Ravana’s perspective of that of a king, and the second from Bhadra, a commoner who is loyal to Ravana. Bhadra narrates the story from a poor man’s point of view. However, in both the stories, Ravana has been shown in a positive light. This is not to say that Neelakantan attempts to defame the Devas. But he simply attempts to put things in perspective from the loser point of view.

 

Ashwin Sanghi’s book, The Krishna Key, is a historical as well as mythological feat that aims to examine Krishna’s existence. Importantly, the book is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the life and history of Lord Krishna and also the Mahabharata. The second part narrates a fictional story of Ravi Mohan Saini. The novel starts with krishna’s history some 5,000 years ago and then merges with the story of Saini who has been accused of murder of his childhood friend Anil Varshney. In an attempt to clear his name, Saini looks into the past of Indian mythology’s grey areas and uncovers the truth about a serial killer who believes himself to be Kalki, the final avatar of Lord Vishnu. Saini travels from the ancient ruins of the lost city of Dvaraka to Vrindavan temples in an attempt to discover one of Krishna’s treasures and stop the killer from murdering his friends who are also under the threat. The biography of Krishna runs in parallel to the main story line. 

 

Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata (The Great Indian Epics Retold), a book by Devdutt Pattanaik, though does not have a new story, plot or characters, but the candid way in which the author retells the story of the Mahabharata is astounding. There is so much clarity and simplicity. The tales, though known, reveal the eternal relevance of the Mahabharata, the complex and disturbing meditation on the human condition that has shaped Indian thought for over 3,000 years. Pattanaik seamlessly weaves into a single narrative plots from the Sanskrit classic as well as its many folk and regional variants, including the Pandavani of Chhattisgarh, Gondhal of Maharashtra, Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu, and Yakshagana of Kamataka.

 
 
 
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