×
E-PAPER ▾

E-paper

HEALTH & FITNESS

People with wrinkles around eyes perceived more sincere: Study

| | Toronto
People with wrinkles around eyes perceived more sincere: Study

People who get wrinkles around their eyes while smiling or frowning are perceived by others as more sincere, according to a study.

Researchers at Western University in Canada have shown that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and more sincere emotions.

This eye-wrinkle feature, called the Duchenne marker, occurs across multiple facial expressions, including smiles, expressions associated with pain, and - as found by the researchers  - expressions of sadness.

Using a method called visual rivalry, the researchers showed  participants photos of expressions with and without the Duchenne marker to study which of the expressions our brains perceive as more important.

When different images are shown in each eye, the brain alternates between these two images, but will bring the image that is perceived as more relevant into perceptual awareness more often.

Visual rivalry is like a window into the unconscious, and demonstrates what our brains involuntarily see as more relevant or important, according to the study published in the journal Emotion.

"The expressions involving the Duchenne marker were always dominant. So if the emotion is more intense, your brain actually prefers to bring it into perceptual awareness for longer time," said Julio Martinez-Trujillo, a professor at Western University.

The researchers also asked participants to rate the expressions on a scale for intensity and sincerity, and found that people systematically ranked the Duchenne smiles and Duchenne sad expressions as more sincere and more intense than the non-Duchenne expressions.

"These findings provide evidence of a potential universal language for reading emotions. In other words, a given facial action may have a single role across multiple facial expressions - especially if that facial action shapes your social interactions," said Nour Malek from Western University.

"For example, knowing if a stranger's smile is genuine and whether that person can be trusted, warns you whether you should evade or not," said Malek.

 
 
 
 
 

TOP STORIES

Sunday Edition

View All

‚ÄėAssault‚Äô on police driver: Action against Kerala ADGP

17 Jun 2018 | VR Jayaraj | Kochi

In a swift move intended at stemming the protests brewing in the State police force against certain top officials’ ‘feudalistic’ practice of persecuting policemen and camp followers by using them as house servants, the Kerala Government on Saturday removed ADGP Sudesh Kumar, whose daughter was the other day booked for assaulting and verbally abusing his official police driver, from the position of head of the Armed Police Battalion. The action against...

Read More

STATE EDITIONS

View All

UTC to use 180 buses to ferry Yoga participants

21 Jun 2018 | PNS | Dehradun

Uttarakhand Transport Corporation (UTC) would use 180 buses of its fleet on Dehradun and Haridwar routes to ferry the Yoga participants from Haridwar and also to take them back after the International Yoga Day show at Forest Research Institute (FRI) in Dehradun is over. Divisional manager (Operational) UTC Dehradun, Pawan Mehra while talking to The pioneer said on Wednesday that around 280 busses operate from Dehradun depot...

Read More

Page generated in 0.2795 seconds.