×
E-PAPER ▾

E-paper

Vivacity

A tribal show

Saturday, 18 March 2017 | Ankita Jain

Designer Aneeth Arora tells Ankita Jain how she has given a vibrant look to her tribal collection

Over the past decade, Aneeth Arora has created a unique vocabulary. With her label Pero, she has been consistently using very ethnic influences to create something international. And this season she has incorporated a mix of elements from China and Latin America (Peru, Mexico and Guatemala). So why such diverse places? “For fall-winter 2017, I decided to open my travel journals and re-visit all those places that I had travelled to and recorded/documented all my memories and everything that inspired me. Also, it is purely out of instinct and also because as an artist I am lucky that I have the liberty to not always be driven by logic. The more I break rules the more liberating this is. Apart from that I also felt that there were many overlaps in the clothing traditions of these places; in terms of neon accents that people in these places use to add colour to their indigo clothing,” said designer Aneeth Arora. She further added, “In China, the accents are added through colourful geometric embroideries, tassels and pompoms, whereas in Latin America, it is done through bold floral embroideries. To my surprise, similar floral embroideries were also seen on the skirts of a few Chinese minorities.”

Drawing inspiration from Miao people of China, the collection elaborated majorly on detailing, through colourful tassels, pom-poms and beaded hangings, which Aneeth said caught his eye, time and again during his travel.

How does this textile designer look at silhouette? “I always come across the traditional clothing that people in villages wear — those little angarakhas, even the simple bandi that they wear with the pocket. They look so comfortable with what they’re wearing and I think they are the best trendsetters. Since I hadn’t travelled much abroad and now I do, I see how people wear clothes,” says Aneeth. “How someone wears one shirt on top of another, or tucks in one half of it… I also look at Scandinavian clothing. Like my textiles, I do draw a lot from traditional clothing - in India and the world over.”

Although the inspiration might be from the minority tribes of China and indigenous people of Latin America, the fabrics and trims developed are very much of Indian origin, alike their previous seasons. “The colourful stripes seen on Peruvian ponchos, have been woven in wool in Kullu, Himachal Pradesh and indigo checks and stripes are hand-woven in West Bengal,” elaborated Aneeth.

“All the beaded trims, tassels and pom-poms have been hand made locally with the women of péro. Bold floral embroideries have been done by our skilled craftsmen who have learnt the art of observing and translating ideas onto clothing as a work of art, by using a mix of techniques that they have mastered over the years,” she shared.

Each on-ramp embroidered piece travelled through the hands of a machine embroiderer to a hand embroiderer and finally into the hands of a hand worker who has added final touches like beads, pompoms, tassels, keeping the age-old tradition of hand-made alive through péro clothing.

“These garments inspired from cultures worldwide, hand-made in

India are made available globally to the wearer who appreciates hand-crafted clothing not only for the love that goes into making them, but also for the stories they narrate,” she said.                   

 

Photos: Pankaj Kumar

 
 
 

TOP STORIES

Sunday Edition

View All

Cutting the cord

26 Mar 2017 | Kushan Mitra

The advent of online streaming services that can stream content directly to your television screen is making the argument for cutting the cable connection more and more convincing, believes Kushan Mitra Is it time to cut the cable? In the past year and a half, online television streaming services Hotstar Premium, Netflix and Amazon Prime Video have launched their services in India. There is also Voot from Viacom18 and Sony LIV...

Read More

STATE EDITIONS

View All

Adiyanath asks party workers not to opt contractual work

27 Mar 2017 | PNS | Lucknow

Asking party workers not to opt for contractual work in government sector Chief Minister Adityanath Yogi said that UP’s face will change in next two months as people have reposed faith on us and it is workers’ responsibility to ensure BJP fulfills all poll promises. “I appeal to the party workers and family members of law makers not to seek contract of government department...

Read More